Public Policy


Smoking-related changes or brand switching?

Smokers' anticipated responses to a large increase

in Taiwan's Tobacco Health and Welfare Surcharge

Public Health, 2016

 

In this study my colleagues and I examine the impact on smokers' behaviour of a planned increase in the Health and Welfare Surcharge of Tobacco Products in Taiwan. We used a structured questionnaire to perform telephone interviews. Applying multinomial logistic regression we found that after the proposed increase in the Health and Welfare Surcharge of Tobacco Products, subsequent cigarette price increases would motivate nearly 30% of the smokers to adopt smoking-related changes and 10% to change to lower-priced brands.


The study was published in the British journal Public Health.


Link to publication:


http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.puhe.2016.02.018



Human Security


Democratic Governance in Northeast Asia

A Human-Centred Approach to Evaluating Democracy

Palgrave/Macmillan, 2015

 

Comprising case studies of Japan, South Korea, and Taiwan, this edited volume explores the key characteristics of democratic governance in Northeast Asia. Each democracy is assessed on the extent to which it enables the flourishing of social capital; prioritizes the interests of all as characterized by freedom from fear and want; and empowers all to participate in the democratic process and governance. With particular focus on the experience of minorities, this volume contends that the acid test of democratic governance is not how well the government represents the interests of the elites, or even the majority, but rather how it cares for the needs of vulnerable groups in society.

 

I authored two chapters of this edited volume:

 

Chapter 6: Taiwanese Democracy

Chapter 7: Debating 'Unpopular' Issues in Taiwan

 

Link to publication



Post-Conflict Development in East Asia

Ashgate, 2014


East Asia is a region deeply affected by conflict. Colonial, ideological, and national wars have left their scars and legacies on regional, international, and national governance. Yet East Asian post-conflict development experiences have been viewed as remarkably successful.

 

In 2013, Brendan Howe asked me to contribute a chapter on Taiwan's post-conflict development and its implications on human security. The final chapter was released in 2014 by Ashgate.

 

Chapter 5: Human Security and Post-Conflict Development in Taiwan (PDF)


Link to publication








New Public Management and University Governance


The Taiwan Higher Education Faculty Survey (THEFS)


Over the last decades, educational systems in many parts of the world have undergone manifold changes that have significantly affected the working environment of educators. The Taiwan Higher Education Faculty Survey (THEFS) aims at obtaining solid information about the current working conditions of teachers at institutions of higher education in Taiwan in order to evaluate the impact of recent reforms on the livelihood of teaching professionals.

 

Among other anticipated negative impacts of  reforms in Taiwan's higher education is the increasing prevalence of workplace bullying. For further information on THEFS and workplace bullying see my research note (PDF).







Transitional Justice


Transitional societies are confronted with the problem of how to deal with the atrocities committed by former authoritarian regimes. Despite the fact that there have been a number of regime transitions in Asia during the last two decades, transitional justice has been an issue hardly addressed in those countries.

 

In 2006, the 2-28 Memorial Foundation (Taiwan) asked me to do a study on how Austria, my home country, had dealt with the past. In my paper, I also looked at the Taiwanese discourse on transitional justice and concluded with several normative policy suggestions. 

 

In 2007, the Foundation for Compensating Improper Verdicts on Sedition and Communist Espionage Cases during the Martial Law Period asked me to analyse the foreign perception of Taiwan's transitional justice initiatives. In my paper, I ascertain that global and local efforts to promote meaningful transitional justice initiatives are interdependent processes in which foreign communities have a mediating function. My study shows that the absence of a constructive dialog between local and global actors marginalized indigenous transitional justice efforts in Taiwan. I presented the results of the study at the International Symposium: The 20th Anniversary of the Lifting of Martial Law in Taiwan (Taipei). 

 

In 2010,  Lavinia Stan and Nadya Nedelsky asked me to author two chapters on transitional justice in Taiwan (PDF) and Austria (PDF), respectively, for the Encyclopedia of Transitional Justice (Cambridge University Press, 2013).

 

In 2013, John Calabrese of the Middle East Institute (Washington, DC) asked me to join the Middle East-Asia Project (MAP) series on 'Pathways to Transitional Justice in the Arab World - Reflections on the Asia Pacific Experience.' The series explores the pursuit of transitional justice in the post-Arab Spring Middle East, and how such efforts could be informed by past and ongoing justice processes in Asia-Pacific countries. My contribution was published in February 2014:

 

The Rise and Fall of Transitional Justice in Taiwan (PDF)

 

 

 







Political Marketing


Evolution and Limitations of Modern Campaigning in East Asia:
A Case Study of Taiwan (Routledge, 2009)


The Routledge Handbook of Political Management is a comprehensive overview of a variety of research areas related to electoral campaigning. In 2007, the editor of the Handbook (Dennis W. Johnson, George Washington University) invited me to contribute a chapter on the evolution and current modus operandi of modern electoral campaigning in Taiwan, one of Asia's most vibrant new democracies.


Chapter 27: Campaigning in East Asia (PDF)




Election Campainging in East and Southeast Asia

(Ashgate, 2006)

 

Social changes in advanced democracies, advancements in media technologies and the global wave of democratisation in the late 1980s contributed to the global spread of US electoral campaign techniques. For over a decade, the international scientific community has endeavoured to formulate a universal theory of political campaigning that would be applicable to all democratic polities and able to explain the causes, dynamics and limitations of this new phenomenon. However, most of the relevant contemporary writing deals with different aspects of campaigning and is restricted to the European and American experience. Concerted efforts to gain a global understanding of campaigning, such as the Global Political Consultancy Survey>, have been rare and have only partially covered Asian democracies. While electoral studies in Western democracies have been strongly influenced by new scientific approaches, the study of Asian elections has seen little analysis. There is thus limited knowledge of how campaigns are run in Asia and how the modus operandi has changed as a result of democratisation. In my edited book Election Campaigning in East and Southeast Asia, I have addressed those important processes.

 

The scientific community positively appraised my work. One leading European scholar, for example, considered the publication as a "timely edited volume" that "marks one of the first attempts to study these processes [Asian electoral campaigning] systematically" (McCargo, Pacific Affairs, vol.  79, no. 4 (Winter 2006-2007): 662). In his book review, the scholar also noted the shortcomings of contemporary research and requested more concerted efforts among Asia scholars. 

 

Reviews


Duncan McCargo, Pacific Affairs, vol. 79, no. 4 (Winter 2006-2007) (PDF)

Arndt Graf, Asien, 109 (October 2008) (PDF)


Table of contents and sample chapters


Table of Contents (PDF)

Chapter 1: The Globalization of Political Marketing: An Introduction (PDF)

Chapter 2: Electoral Campaigning in Japan (PDF)

Chapter 3: Electoral Campaigning in Taiwan (PDF)

Chapter 6: Is There an Asian Style of Electoral Campaining? (PDF)



Content Analysis of Newspaper and TV Advertisements

Taiwan's 2004 Presidential Election 


In this study, all political advertisements placed in Taiwan’s leading newspapers and aired on Taiwan's most popular terrestrial and cable television stations during the official campaign period of 28 days (21 February - 19 March 2004) were analyzed.


Download full paper in PDF for free








Democratic Development





In the late 1980s, a number of states in Asia entered the process of liberalisation and democratisation. Since then, I have personally witnessed key events in the democratisation processes of South Korea, Taiwan, Thailand and Mongolia.

 

State of Democracy in Asia

 

In November 2008, the Asian Political and International Studies Association invited me to participate in an international conference on the state of democracy in Asia. In my presented paper (PDF), I argue that democratic consolidation in Taiwan has mainly to do with the question of how to overcome the legacies of the former authoritarian regime. In addition, I ascertain that the growing self-dramatisation of political events has prevented any constructive political discourse for the last eight years.  I came to a similar conclusion in September 2008 when I did research on the new Thai democracy movement, which was published in New Mandala, a blog by Andrew Walker and Nicholas Farrelly of Australian National University.

 

Populism in East Asia's New Democracies:

An Analysis of the Taiwanese Discourse

 

The rise of right-wing political leaders and movements in advanced European democracies at the end of the last century has triggered numerous debates about populism, its causes, and its role in modern democracies. Through these debates and through previous studies, we have gained a profound knowledge about populism in Europe and the Americas. Nevertheless, comparatively little research has been carried out on the nature, scope and development of populism in the new democracies of Asia. In 2007, I presented a paper at the 5th International Convention of Asia Scholars (Kuala Lumpur). The paper deals with the discourse of Taiwanese intellectuals on the development and implications of populism in Taiwan. It was later published in:

 

M. Parvizi Amineh, State, Society and International Relations in Asia, Amsterdam University Press, 2010: pp. 133-148 (PDF)

 

 

 

Consolidation of democracy and historical legacies:

A case study of Taiwan

 

In political science there is broad interest in whether a newly established democracy succeeds in overcoming the perils of democratisation and matures into a consolidated democracy or regresses to authoritarianism. Taiwan was under martial law for almost four decades. Democratic consolidation, therefore, is primarily a question of how to overcome the legacies of the former authoritarian regime. Nationalism and dysfunctional political institutions are some of the legacies that limit Taiwan’s democratic development. The study of these destructive elements is important in the attempt to interpret Taiwan’s most recent political history and to formulate effective democracy-building policies. In September 2009, I presented a paper dealing with the aforementioned legacies and their implications for Taiwan's current and future democratic development at the University of Vienna, Austria (conference agenda).

 

The paper was later published in:

 

Journal of Contemporary Eastern Asia, Vol. 9 (2010) No. 1: 23-41

http://dx.doi.org/10.17477/jcea.2010.9.1.023

 

 

Taiwan's Nuclear Dream: An Analysis of Political and Ecological Problems and Current Discussions

 

In spite of the declining demand for nuclear power plants in the western world, Taiwan sees in them the key to economic growth and closer (political) ties with the USA. This paper examines the nuclear policy of the Taiwanese government, the environmental problems caused by the country's nuclear power plants, the public attitude toward the nuclear option and the current discussion on the expansion of the nuclear power generating industry.

 

Cathay Skripten, Heft 10 (September 1998)

Ruhr University Bochum

 







Elections







For the last fifteen years, I have observed elections in Taiwan, Japan, South Korea, Thailand and Mongolia. Here are some of my publications:

 

  • Parliamentary election in Thailand, 23 December 2007
    Electoral Studies, 28 (March 2009) (PDF)
  • Content Analysis of Newspaper and Television Advertisements: A Case Study of Taiwan's 2004 Presidential Election
    Modern East Asia, vol. 3, no. 4 (December 2004) (PDF)
  • The Great State Hural election in Mongolia, June 2004
    Electoral Studies, 24 (2005): 741-747 (PDF)
  • Taiwan's party system and political culture (1945-2005)
    Modern East Asia, vol. 4, no. 1 (2005): 1-25 (PDF) 
  • Legislative Yuan Election, Taiwan 2001
    Electoral Studies, 22 (2003): 532-537 (PDF)
  • The 2001 National and Local Elections in Taiwan
    Taiwan Papers 4 (October 2002) (PDF)
  • The 1997 Local Elections in Taiwan
    Cathay Skripten Heft 9 (September 1998) (PDF)


The Power of the Ballot Box:
Political Development and Election Campaigning in Taiwan

Lexington, 2003


In this book I look beyond regional and global causes of democratisation to pinpoint the true indigenous foundations of Taiwan's political development, and examine the pivotal importance of local elections in the island's democratisation process. Based on extensive research and in-depth interviews with leading Taiwanese politicians and political scientists, the book provides a detailed history of Taiwan's electoral experience from the Japanese colonial period, through the Kuomintang regime, to the present day.


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